Protecting Wood In The 21st Century – What Builders & Architects Need To Know – Free CEU Webinar

 

Protecting wood isn’t just the matter of sending material to a pressure treater and using toxic chemicals – there are options! Technology doesn’t need to mean only iPads, electric cars and solar panels; it may be less sexy, but protecting wood is actually becoming more and more important. This is due to wood being the only renewable building material readily available on the market. Now, with the drastically increasing use of CLT’s (Cross Laminated Timbers), finding new ways to protect the wood used in construction is a necessity, not an option. We will show attendees that incredible new technologies, not available until recently, are changing the way wood is protected in all markets around the world


Lessons Learned

  1. Reviewing the old ways – Toxic, expensive, heavy
  2. The beginning of the change – How intumescents began the avalanche
  3. New coatings (yes, COATINGS!) – Changing the game completely
  4. The future of protection – Adapt or risk everything


Continuing Education Units (CEUS)

  • GBCI 
  • AIA(HSW)
  • NARI Green
  • Certified Green Professional (CGP)
  • AIBD
  • Certified GreenHome Professional (CGHP)
  • May be applicable to your state-based design or contractor license*


Instructors

Robert Seaman is 3rd generation lumber executive from Thunder Bay, Canada. His grandfather, Bert Seaman, began Great West Timber, Bay Wood Forest Products, and numerous other sawmilling and treatment companies as far back as the 1940’s. His father, Tim Seaman, built the world’s most advanced wood pressure treatment facility in Shelburne, Ontario, in 1984. Robert started NexGen (originally called New Wood Technologies) in 2003 and lead a team to develop the most effective system for protecting wood which is called NexGen. With a head office in Vancouver, Canada, the center of the lumber universe, NexGen has satellite offices in Sydney, Shanghai, New York, and London. NexGen has provided or is providing coating material for the Sydney Opera House, the Panama Canal Expansion Project, and many other large-and-small-scale developments around the world.